Activity #3. Glow in the dark Magic Milk

 

Name of the activity: Glow in the dark Magic Milk (chemistry)

Age group: Kindergarten (age 3-5)

Duration: 20 – 30 mins

Materials: Blacklight, milk, dish soap, toothpicks/Q-tips, neon & glow in the dark paints, plastic plates, bowls

Description:

This is an extension of Activity #2. Magic Milk. Instead of regular colorings, the students will create glow in the dark coloring base using neon and glow in the dark paints. The students will pour the milk on the plate, turn all the lights off and turn the black light on. Using the dropper or other tools, they will drop the colors into the milk. The colors will glow in the dark. Then they will drop a drop of dish soap into the milk using a toothpick or a Q-tip and observe how the colors react in the milk! The video does not specify, but in each attempt (take 1, 2, 3), the teacher can ask the students questions such as “What should we do to make the colors spread out?” or “What can we do to make the paints more watery?” The students will be encouraged to observe other students’ plates and share their ideas about their work. 

Skills that students will enhance through the activity: analysis skills, observation skills, co-operation/discussion skills, hypothesis skills.

 

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Activity #2. Magic Milk

Learn about color theory with this magic milk experiment from Life Lesson Plans         Learn about color theory with this magic milk experiment from Life Lesson Plans

Figure 3. Magic milk experiment. Adopted from “magic milk,” by B. parent savvy. Retrieved April, 9th, 2017, from http://parentsavvy.com/articles-and-blog/298/. Copyright 2017 by B. Parentsavvy.com.

Name of the activity: Magic Milk (chemistry)

Age group: Kindergarten (3-5 years old)

Duration: 40 minutes

Materials: Milk, white glue, dish soap, toothpicks/Q-tips, food colorings, plastic plate

Description:

Each student gets to have a plastic plate and fill half of the plate with the milk. Let each student chooses 3 – 4 food colorings that they prefer. Then, ask them to spread some food colorings on their plate and provide each student with a toothpick and have a drop of dish soap. When each student has a toothpick with dish soap drop, let them touch the food colorings’ spots with their toothpicks. Then, the teacher can discuss the outcome of the activity. For example, by asking how does milk + food colorings react with a drop of dish soap.

On another plate, the students will fill their plate with white glue and continue with the same process as with the previous (milk) activity. The students will observe the outcome of how the food coloring is spread out after they drop it in the dish soap.

Extension of the activity:

After both of the activities are done, the teacher can engage the students in a class discussion on the different outcomes of the milk and the glue. Through this discussion, the students will utilize their observation skills and be able to compare the results and learn to analyze the information gathered through their discussion and thus learn effectively by constructing knowledge through comparing their previous knowledge to the new knowledge they acquired.

Furthermore, the teacher can provide different setting using similar materials. For example, instead of providing regular food colorings, the teacher may provide glow in the dark or neon paints and use a blacklight to make them glow. The reaction of paints and milk would be similar, but the visual outcome will be fascinating!

Skills that students will enhance through the activity: analysis skills, observation skills, co-operation/discussion skills, hypothesis skills.

Activity #1. Rain cloud in a jar

 

https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/201304102887-RainCloudJar.jpg

Figure 4. Colorful rain cloud in a jar activity. Adopted from “the science behind clouds,” by S. Wells, “Steve Spangler Science”. Retrieved April, 9th, 2017, from https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/blog/2013/04/15/cloud-in-a-bottle/. Copyright 2015 by S. SteveSpanglerScience.com.

 

Name of the activity: Rain cloud in a jar activity (Rain cycle/ Water particle; chemistry)

Age group: Kindergarten (3-5 years old)

Duration: 20 minutes

Materials: Shaving cream, food colorings, clear container/ clear glass jar

Description:

This is a very simple activity that can be implemented with kindergarten age students and children.

Each student will get to have a clear glass jar filled with cold water (about ¾ or half the glass jar).

Then, student get to filled in the shaving cream top of the cold water, let them choose food colorings that they prefer and carefully drop some of them on the shaving cream (in their clear glass jar).

The students will observe the food coloring is absorbed through the shaving foam and see the food coloring will be dropped down to the bottom of the jar.

Extension of the activity:

As an extension of the activity, the teacher can engage students in a class discussion that connects to rain cycle, the clear glass jar represents the cloud and the food colorings represent the rain (rain particle is denser than the cloud) particle).

Skills that students will enhance through activity: analysis skills, observation skills, co-operation/ discussion skills.